Monday, May 18, 2015

Blog #9: Starting a discussion

Due: Monday, May 22, at the end of class
350 words minimum
2 links minimum

Your blogs this week will be the basis for class discussions next week. It's very important these get done by Friday so I can spend some time this weekend to put together discussions for next week. Your help is greatly appreciated.

Take a look at one (or a few) of the following sites that deal with current issues in Journalism and New Media. | Pew Internet and American Life Project | Pew Research Center | Columbia Journalism Review |  Journalist's Resource | Sensible Talk: Analysis | NPR's On The Media | | New Media @ Media Life|Online Journalism Review | | |

1. Either find an article that presents or raises  a great question and explore it. Examine the author's points and bring in some points that either support or refute it. Finally, ask questions that could lead to a great class discussion based on what you researched.

2. Ask questions first and find articles that could give clues to answers. Create the discussion yourself.

For example: I found this tremendous article on the influence of a single person on journalism that could be greater than Twitter or even Facebook. I would love to start a discussion based on this, including the visual data included in the article. I'd reflect on it, finding some other sources that helped with my understanding and then include some questions to start a discussion.

Monday, May 11, 2015

Blog #8: Where do you get your news?

Due Date: Friday, May 15
Word Count: At least 400
Links: At least 2
Blogs that do not meet minimum expectations will not be given points.

Consider your news quiz scores over the past 10 days.

You've spent the last 10 days being exposed to news that comes from sources you don't typically consult. You've hopefully learned something or evolved in your way of thinking about news in general.

When you think back on your experience, what conclusions can you come to about;

  • The purpose or biases of your news source,

  • The point of news,

  • The importance of news,

  • Your attitudes toward news,

  • Whether you'd keep looking for news,

  • Where people should look for news,

  • or anything else.

Once you've thought about your own reactions, take a stab at one of the questions you came up with as a group at the start of last week. What meaningful conclusions can you come to?

Why does news matter?

Why is news so depressing?

Why is “cute cats” news?

How much of news is entertainment?

Who defines news?

Are you better off if you’re up to date on news?
Are you worse off knowing?

Why are there so many places to get news, why not narrow it down to five?

Does anything change when you’re looking at news?

How does news make you feel?

How does it benefit you?

How can you make others better through your knowledge?

Why do we get so interested in things that are none of our business?